2018 Summer Game Plan

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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby LimerickPensFan on Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:16 pm

stonewizard51 wrote:
Daniel wrote:
stonewizard51 wrote:To put that into perspective it equals 40 ppt (parts per trillion). NHL needs some serious standards here. It's not like he was intentionally bulking up or anything.


I don't know how drugs come out of your system, does the ppt lessen over time or stay the same then gone? If it lessens, from the NHL perceptive what was it a month ago (or whenever)?

In general though, I think with all sports that all medication should be through the league either through a league doctor (or whoever would prescribe the medicine), then to a league run pharmacy. If it's tainted, then it's the leagues responsibility. If the players do something outside of that, they're on their own. How many times do they say "I didn't know?". Well, let the leagues figure that out and have the unions pay into it as part of the health benefits.

If sports are going to be so strict that players can be suspended for such a low amount, then the leagues need to be 100% involved in what medications and other supplements the players are taking. If a player puts something into his body that isn't from the league, that's on them. That should include anything that can get them banned, whether it be protein drinks, medication, supplements, etc.


Anabolic steroids and other forms of PED's take some time to exit the body. Granted some leave in a few weeks once an individual stops taking them but some steriods and other hormones will take longer since the body must be gradually weaned off them. Therefore, at least from my understanding, the longer one takes PED's the longer it takes to get off them. There are clues to look for such as bulking up of muscle mass when taking PED's. Think Ovechkin here.

I guess where I was going with my thought was for every trillion parts of something, know that 40 parts of it is something that in higher concentrations could do some serious damage. The body will hardly notice something that small. If the body would scarcely notice it why should the NHL worry about it in those small amounts. However, that being said, your point of how long it stays in the body is well taken. It will lessen over time. It's not like it's there one day and then next day it's gone so the notion that he may have taken them and stopped a month or so ago so he'd be clean by training camp is a good thought. I do agree the NHL needs to be involved if they're going to be that picky over a small amount.

My guess is that what happened here was he was taking whatever it was and stopped in what he thought was time for testing and just went a day too long. Yeah, they only found a trace amount, but that doesn't mean he wasn't fully juiced all summer while trying to build up his strength.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby FLPensFan on Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:20 pm

LimerickPensFan wrote:
stonewizard51 wrote:
Daniel wrote:
stonewizard51 wrote:To put that into perspective it equals 40 ppt (parts per trillion). NHL needs some serious standards here. It's not like he was intentionally bulking up or anything.


I don't know how drugs come out of your system, does the ppt lessen over time or stay the same then gone? If it lessens, from the NHL perceptive what was it a month ago (or whenever)?

In general though, I think with all sports that all medication should be through the league either through a league doctor (or whoever would prescribe the medicine), then to a league run pharmacy. If it's tainted, then it's the leagues responsibility. If the players do something outside of that, they're on their own. How many times do they say "I didn't know?". Well, let the leagues figure that out and have the unions pay into it as part of the health benefits.

If sports are going to be so strict that players can be suspended for such a low amount, then the leagues need to be 100% involved in what medications and other supplements the players are taking. If a player puts something into his body that isn't from the league, that's on them. That should include anything that can get them banned, whether it be protein drinks, medication, supplements, etc.


Anabolic steroids and other forms of PED's take some time to exit the body. Granted some leave in a few weeks once an individual stops taking them but some steriods and other hormones will take longer since the body must be gradually weaned off them. Therefore, at least from my understanding, the longer one takes PED's the longer it takes to get off them. There are clues to look for such as bulking up of muscle mass when taking PED's. Think Ovechkin here.

I guess where I was going with my thought was for every trillion parts of something, know that 40 parts of it is something that in higher concentrations could do some serious damage. The body will hardly notice something that small. If the body would scarcely notice it why should the NHL worry about it in those small amounts. However, that being said, your point of how long it stays in the body is well taken. It will lessen over time. It's not like it's there one day and then next day it's gone so the notion that he may have taken them and stopped a month or so ago so he'd be clean by training camp is a good thought. I do agree the NHL needs to be involved if they're going to be that picky over a small amount.

My guess is that what happened here was he was taking whatever it was and stopped in what he thought was time for testing and just went a day too long. Yeah, they only found a trace amount, but that doesn't mean he wasn't fully juiced all summer while trying to build up his strength.

Odds are pretty slim on that if you ask me.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby LimerickPensFan on Tue Sep 04, 2018 8:46 am

FLPensFan wrote:
LimerickPensFan wrote:My guess is that what happened here was he was taking whatever it was and stopped in what he thought was time for testing and just went a day too long. Yeah, they only found a trace amount, but that doesn't mean he wasn't fully juiced all summer while trying to build up his strength.

Odds are pretty slim on that if you ask me.

Seems the most likely explanation to me. If something were to be contaminated, it would probably be more than what was reported.

You don't think these guys try to sneak by with some extracurricular pharmaceuticals, particularly during the offseason?
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby Jim on Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:34 am

That's not how that kind of roid-ing works. It's not a take for a little, build up, stop taking and you maintain.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby ville5 on Tue Sep 04, 2018 10:16 am

Jordy Bellerive to play in the 3 game rookie tournament this weekend in Buffalo. https://triblive.com/sports/penguins/14 ... tournament
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby LimerickPensFan on Tue Sep 04, 2018 10:34 am

Jim wrote:That's not how that kind of roid-ing works. It's not a take for a little, build up, stop taking and you maintain.

From here:
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2012/07/16/156852263/athletes-look-for-doping-edge-despite-tests-and-risks

Elite athletes might use [steroids] for three months a year in the off season


The athlete is not trying to build strength during the season, they are trying to maintain at that point. The steroids allow for a more effective workout. You would be using it when building strength, not when maintaining. Since the building is done in offseason, it would not be surprising to see an athlete use during the offseason and stop using during the season. Also the fact that they aren't being tested in the offseason would add to that.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby Great58 on Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:06 am

FLPensFan wrote:Odds are pretty slim on that if you ask me.

What gives you that impression?
Without knowing the substance, I think it's really hard to know how to interpret the news.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby Pruezy11881 on Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:29 am

ville5 wrote:Jordy Bellerive to play in the 3 game rookie tournament this weekend in Buffalo. https://triblive.com/sports/penguins/14 ... tournament

I hope that Connor Roberts comes in and earns a contract. He's big, bodied kid who has a lot of tools in his box. I think he could end up being another steal for the Pens.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby FLPensFan on Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:30 am

For those interested, right now, it appears that only games involving the Buffalo Sabres will be streamed at this weekend's Prospect Challenge. Penguins play Buffalo at 12:30pm on Monday the 10th. Check out the Sabres website on Monday to find the live stream.

Penguins have stated they do not plan to stream any games. Boston and NJ have not commented one way or another.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby penny lane on Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:38 am

Jason Mackey
‏Verified account @JMackeyPG

Plenty of guys skating this morning in Cranberry: Brassard, Riikola, Crosby, Hornqvist, Hagelin, Johnson, Cullen, Guentzel, Ruhwedel, Simon, Oleksiak, Aston-Reese and Maatta. Might be missing one or two more.

The boys are returning... :D
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby FLPensFan on Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:43 am

penny lane wrote:
Jason Mackey
‏Verified account @JMackeyPG

Plenty of guys skating this morning in Cranberry: Brassard, Riikola, Crosby, Hornqvist, Hagelin, Johnson, Cullen, Guentzel, Ruhwedel, Simon, Oleksiak, Aston-Reese and Maatta. Might be missing one or two more.

The boys are returning... :D

Going to start a new thread with all the informal workouts/dev camp/training camp talk....
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby no name on Thu Sep 06, 2018 1:29 pm

To put that into perspective it equals 40 ppt (parts per trillion). NHL needs some serious standards here. It's not like he was intentionally bulking up or anything.


That is what is left in his blood, now at the end of the season you can try to bulk up on steroids, then by the time of the first blood test your body might be clear. As far as I understand the chemicals that in the CBA are the rare ones that would be hard to find in other substances or supplements. And most of these are to protect the players and the dignity of the league.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby dark_forces on Fri Sep 07, 2018 3:01 pm

Any details anybody can glean from the latest TIOPS article?
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby stonewizard51 on Fri Sep 07, 2018 5:23 pm

no name wrote:
To put that into perspective it equals 40 ppt (parts per trillion). NHL needs some serious standards here. It's not like he was intentionally bulking up or anything.


That is what is left in his blood, now at the end of the season you can try to bulk up on steroids, then by the time of the first blood test your body might be clear. As far as I understand the chemicals that in the CBA are the rare ones that would be hard to find in other substances or supplements. And most of these are to protect the players and the dignity of the league.

Yeah I get that but from what I've read he didn't bulk up. He's pretty much the same as he was during the SCF. I go back to Ovechkin as an example. He bulked up and it took awhile for him to lose most of that mass even after he was able to pass the drug screen. Plus Schmidt didn't exhibit the side effects of steroid use at least not that has been written about.

I'm not about to stand up and defend someone who uses that stuff in any way shape for form. The only point I was trying to make was if the level of detection is so small the body won't do anything with it then the NHL doing something at this point is like closing the barn door after the cows get out. The only thing the NHL did was tell guys they need to stop using that **** long enough to get it totally out of their system. If they want to curb the use then make drug screens mandatory during the off season too. Yeah I know not gonna happen but it's just a thought.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby longtimefan on Fri Sep 07, 2018 6:13 pm

stonewizard51 wrote:
no name wrote:
To put that into perspective it equals 40 ppt (parts per trillion). NHL needs some serious standards here. It's not like he was intentionally bulking up or anything.


That is what is left in his blood, now at the end of the season you can try to bulk up on steroids, then by the time of the first blood test your body might be clear. As far as I understand the chemicals that in the CBA are the rare ones that would be hard to find in other substances or supplements. And most of these are to protect the players and the dignity of the league.

Yeah I get that but from what I've read he didn't bulk up. He's pretty much the same as he was during the SCF. I go back to Ovechkin as an example. He bulked up and it took awhile for him to lose most of that mass even after he was able to pass the drug screen. Plus Schmidt didn't exhibit the side effects of steroid use at least not that has been written about.

I'm not about to stand up and defend someone who uses that stuff in any way shape for form. The only point I was trying to make was if the level of detection is so small the body won't do anything with it then the NHL doing something at this point is like closing the barn door after the cows get out. The only thing the NHL did was tell guys they need to stop using that **** long enough to get it totally out of their system. If they want to curb the use then make drug screens mandatory during the off season too. Yeah I know not gonna happen but it's just a thought.


It's not on the league. The drug test is collectively bargained down to what levels are considered positive. The truth is, the NHL has had very few suspensions. To the point where this article from 2016 made the case that the policy wasn't strict enough.
https://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/why ... od-enough/

NHL players are either the cleanest athletes in the sporting world, or the NHL’s “Performance Enhancing Substances Program” has some serious work to do.

You decide.

But first, consider:

On Tuesday another small fish in Shawn Horcoff joined the likes of Zenon Konopka and Sean Hill as players suspended under the program. Every few years, a suspension announcement pushes us to point out the basic, head-scratching numbers behind the NHL/NHLPA’s Performance Enhancing Substances Program:

10 years — The span in which the NHL has publicly suspended only three NHL players for PED use (listed above).

800 players — The conservative, round-number estimate of how many men skate in an NHL game each season.

$2.6 million U.S. — That’s the average salary in the NHL. Consider how many bobsledders, cross country skiers, shot putters and cyclists have tested positive for PEDs in a quest for financial gains of perhaps 10 per cent of the average NHL salary.

So, 800 players a season. Eleven seasons. Mega, mega millions at stake, yet while Major League Baseball has issued 35 drug suspensions since 2007, the NHL is stuck at three.


I know Jarrod Tinordi joined the list a couple of years ago, but if they were being overly strict, you'd have more suspensions.

Here's an article comparing the NHL policy to those of other sports. They do in fact test have random during the off-season, but they only test 60 players max.

•The NHL and NHLPA maintain a list of prohibited substances. Changes to the list can be made only as negotiated by the NHL and the NHLPA. There is no retesting of samples based on substances added to the prohibited substances list after the time of the original testing.

•Any form of substance abuse for drugs of abuse and behavioral and domestic issues requiring employee assistance will be monitored through the NHL/NHLPA for Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health.

•Players receive education on prohibited substances and the nature of the program each league year. No testing takes place and no discipline can be imposed under the program until the Program Committee has provided players with an orientation session regarding the program.

•Every player who has participated in an orientation session is subject to testing as follows: each club will be subject to team-wide no-notice testing once during training camp; each club will be selected at random for team-wide no-notice testing once during the regular season; individual players will be randomly selected for no-notice testing during the regular season and playoffs; tests are not conducted on game days.

•During the off-season, each player who has participated in an orientation session will be subject to testing as follows: a league-wide maximum of 60 tests may be conducted during each off-season; individual players will be randomly selected for no-notice testing.


I know the NHL does almost everything wrong, but they can't take any blame here. Whatever rule Schmidt broke was agreed to by both the union and league long before the positive test. It's as much on the union as the league, and, ultimately, it has to lie at the feet of Schmidt.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby FLPensFan on Sat Sep 08, 2018 8:13 am

Jason Mackey spoke to Mike Sullivan yesterday on a variety of common topics. The highlights are:

- Sullivan feels Jack Johnson gives the Penguins something they haven't had in some time, a guy who can help in front of the net, down low beneath the hashmarks and behind the net. He said he should help give balance to having a puck moving defenseman on every pair, and talked about Johnson's ability to make a strong outlet pass. No d pairings etched in stone yet, but Johnson saying he'll play either side is helpful.

- Sullivan says they will very likely explore Brassard at wing. Sully said it is something that was mentioned in exit interviews by Brassard that (besides the injuries), getting 3rd line minutes was a bit of a struggle for him in adjusting as well.

- On Sprong, he said patience with a player is almost never a bad thing. In terms of what to work on, Sullivan seemed to indicate his play without the puck, however, offensively and not necessarily defensively. Basically, if you watched DK's Cody Tucker breakdown on Sprong, he hit the nail on the head. Sullivan said Sprong needs to work on spacing, especially if he is to play with someone with Crosby. Needs to know when to offer support, when to back off and give him room, and when to be in position to make a play. Said they see Sprong as someone that can play up and down the lineup. Says where he plays will depend a lot on how Sprong does, but also how others on the roster are performing.

-Final topic was just about Letang, and basically, managing his minutes, and finding the sweet spot for him to be most effective.

Full article here: http://www.post-gazette.com/sports/penguins/2018/09/07/Mike-Sullivan-talks-Jack-Johnson-Derick-Brassard-playing-the-wing-and-more/stories/201809070150
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby stonewizard51 on Sat Sep 08, 2018 9:24 am

longtimefan wrote:
stonewizard51 wrote:
no name wrote:
To put that into perspective it equals 40 ppt (parts per trillion). NHL needs some serious standards here. It's not like he was intentionally bulking up or anything.


That is what is left in his blood, now at the end of the season you can try to bulk up on steroids, then by the time of the first blood test your body might be clear. As far as I understand the chemicals that in the CBA are the rare ones that would be hard to find in other substances or supplements. And most of these are to protect the players and the dignity of the league.

Yeah I get that but from what I've read he didn't bulk up. He's pretty much the same as he was during the SCF. I go back to Ovechkin as an example. He bulked up and it took awhile for him to lose most of that mass even after he was able to pass the drug screen. Plus Schmidt didn't exhibit the side effects of steroid use at least not that has been written about.

I'm not about to stand up and defend someone who uses that stuff in any way shape for form. The only point I was trying to make was if the level of detection is so small the body won't do anything with it then the NHL doing something at this point is like closing the barn door after the cows get out. The only thing the NHL did was tell guys they need to stop using that **** long enough to get it totally out of their system. If they want to curb the use then make drug screens mandatory during the off season too. Yeah I know not gonna happen but it's just a thought.


It's not on the league. The drug test is collectively bargained down to what levels are considered positive. The truth is, the NHL has had very few suspensions. To the point where this article from 2016 made the case that the policy wasn't strict enough.
https://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/why ... od-enough/

NHL players are either the cleanest athletes in the sporting world, or the NHL’s “Performance Enhancing Substances Program” has some serious work to do.

You decide.

But first, consider:

On Tuesday another small fish in Shawn Horcoff joined the likes of Zenon Konopka and Sean Hill as players suspended under the program. Every few years, a suspension announcement pushes us to point out the basic, head-scratching numbers behind the NHL/NHLPA’s Performance Enhancing Substances Program:

10 years — The span in which the NHL has publicly suspended only three NHL players for PED use (listed above).

800 players — The conservative, round-number estimate of how many men skate in an NHL game each season.

$2.6 million U.S. — That’s the average salary in the NHL. Consider how many bobsledders, cross country skiers, shot putters and cyclists have tested positive for PEDs in a quest for financial gains of perhaps 10 per cent of the average NHL salary.

So, 800 players a season. Eleven seasons. Mega, mega millions at stake, yet while Major League Baseball has issued 35 drug suspensions since 2007, the NHL is stuck at three.


I know Jarrod Tinordi joined the list a couple of years ago, but if they were being overly strict, you'd have more suspensions.

Here's an article comparing the NHL policy to those of other sports. They do in fact test have random during the off-season, but they only test 60 players max.

•The NHL and NHLPA maintain a list of prohibited substances. Changes to the list can be made only as negotiated by the NHL and the NHLPA. There is no retesting of samples based on substances added to the prohibited substances list after the time of the original testing.

•Any form of substance abuse for drugs of abuse and behavioral and domestic issues requiring employee assistance will be monitored through the NHL/NHLPA for Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health.

•Players receive education on prohibited substances and the nature of the program each league year. No testing takes place and no discipline can be imposed under the program until the Program Committee has provided players with an orientation session regarding the program.

•Every player who has participated in an orientation session is subject to testing as follows: each club will be subject to team-wide no-notice testing once during training camp; each club will be selected at random for team-wide no-notice testing once during the regular season; individual players will be randomly selected for no-notice testing during the regular season and playoffs; tests are not conducted on game days.

•During the off-season, each player who has participated in an orientation session will be subject to testing as follows: a league-wide maximum of 60 tests may be conducted during each off-season; individual players will be randomly selected for no-notice testing.


I know the NHL does almost everything wrong, but they can't take any blame here. Whatever rule Schmidt broke was agreed to by both the union and league long before the positive test. It's as much on the union as the league, and, ultimately, it has to lie at the feet of Schmidt.

All true. Bottom line is every guy has been told what is / is not acceptable and they have to be responsible for what they put into their body regardless of how minute the amount of the stuff is. Schmidt got caught and has to pay up. It sucks but that's the way it is. Plus he lost in arbitration. Next will be how consistent the league will be the next time someone gets caught and someone will get caught.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby FLPensFan on Sat Sep 08, 2018 4:01 pm

stonewizard51 wrote:
longtimefan wrote:
stonewizard51 wrote:
no name wrote:
To put that into perspective it equals 40 ppt (parts per trillion). NHL needs some serious standards here. It's not like he was intentionally bulking up or anything.


That is what is left in his blood, now at the end of the season you can try to bulk up on steroids, then by the time of the first blood test your body might be clear. As far as I understand the chemicals that in the CBA are the rare ones that would be hard to find in other substances or supplements. And most of these are to protect the players and the dignity of the league.

Yeah I get that but from what I've read he didn't bulk up. He's pretty much the same as he was during the SCF. I go back to Ovechkin as an example. He bulked up and it took awhile for him to lose most of that mass even after he was able to pass the drug screen. Plus Schmidt didn't exhibit the side effects of steroid use at least not that has been written about.

I'm not about to stand up and defend someone who uses that stuff in any way shape for form. The only point I was trying to make was if the level of detection is so small the body won't do anything with it then the NHL doing something at this point is like closing the barn door after the cows get out. The only thing the NHL did was tell guys they need to stop using that **** long enough to get it totally out of their system. If they want to curb the use then make drug screens mandatory during the off season too. Yeah I know not gonna happen but it's just a thought.


It's not on the league. The drug test is collectively bargained down to what levels are considered positive. The truth is, the NHL has had very few suspensions. To the point where this article from 2016 made the case that the policy wasn't strict enough.
https://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/why ... od-enough/

NHL players are either the cleanest athletes in the sporting world, or the NHL’s “Performance Enhancing Substances Program” has some serious work to do.

You decide.

But first, consider:

On Tuesday another small fish in Shawn Horcoff joined the likes of Zenon Konopka and Sean Hill as players suspended under the program. Every few years, a suspension announcement pushes us to point out the basic, head-scratching numbers behind the NHL/NHLPA’s Performance Enhancing Substances Program:

10 years — The span in which the NHL has publicly suspended only three NHL players for PED use (listed above).

800 players — The conservative, round-number estimate of how many men skate in an NHL game each season.

$2.6 million U.S. — That’s the average salary in the NHL. Consider how many bobsledders, cross country skiers, shot putters and cyclists have tested positive for PEDs in a quest for financial gains of perhaps 10 per cent of the average NHL salary.

So, 800 players a season. Eleven seasons. Mega, mega millions at stake, yet while Major League Baseball has issued 35 drug suspensions since 2007, the NHL is stuck at three.


I know Jarrod Tinordi joined the list a couple of years ago, but if they were being overly strict, you'd have more suspensions.

Here's an article comparing the NHL policy to those of other sports. They do in fact test have random during the off-season, but they only test 60 players max.

•The NHL and NHLPA maintain a list of prohibited substances. Changes to the list can be made only as negotiated by the NHL and the NHLPA. There is no retesting of samples based on substances added to the prohibited substances list after the time of the original testing.

•Any form of substance abuse for drugs of abuse and behavioral and domestic issues requiring employee assistance will be monitored through the NHL/NHLPA for Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health.

•Players receive education on prohibited substances and the nature of the program each league year. No testing takes place and no discipline can be imposed under the program until the Program Committee has provided players with an orientation session regarding the program.

•Every player who has participated in an orientation session is subject to testing as follows: each club will be subject to team-wide no-notice testing once during training camp; each club will be selected at random for team-wide no-notice testing once during the regular season; individual players will be randomly selected for no-notice testing during the regular season and playoffs; tests are not conducted on game days.

•During the off-season, each player who has participated in an orientation session will be subject to testing as follows: a league-wide maximum of 60 tests may be conducted during each off-season; individual players will be randomly selected for no-notice testing.


I know the NHL does almost everything wrong, but they can't take any blame here. Whatever rule Schmidt broke was agreed to by both the union and league long before the positive test. It's as much on the union as the league, and, ultimately, it has to lie at the feet of Schmidt.

All true. Bottom line is every guy has been told what is / is not acceptable and they have to be responsible for what they put into their body regardless of how minute the amount of the stuff is. Schmidt got caught and has to pay up. It sucks but that's the way it is. Plus he lost in arbitration. Next will be how consistent the league will be the next time someone gets caught and someone will get caught.

I would need to see some more specifics that I have not seen.....specifically, when the test request was made and when he was tested. In the offseason, if they request a drug test, you have two weeks to take that test. It's all conjecture, but a player that is trying to get something flushed out of their system is probably going to push the limits of when they submit to the test (ie, towards the end of that two week period).

Katie Strang has been doing killer work all year long with the Athletic, and she did a piece on this as well. Among the comments are the fact that Schmidt believes a piece of tainted meat may have been the cause. Might sound far-fetched, but Strang gave an example of an NFL player in 2016 that had a similar statement a few years ago. He was cleared after the NFLPA was able to trace it back to tainted meat the player ate in Mexico during his bye week. Boxer Canelo Anthony was also cited, who went through the same thing with contaminated meat. Anthony submitted to a hair follicle test, which came back negative, and provided more credibility to his statement of the source.

As you said, NHL and NHLPA have agreed on the system, but, it seems like there needs to be a better appeals system built in. I think some here believe it is easy to keep track of all this stuff. It's not. Imagine if you were subject to random drug tests at your work, you knew you were 100% clean, but tested positive for something in a trace amount like this. How would you even begin to track this stuff down, without having the resources a professional baseball player has at their disposal?

Here's the Strang article: https://theathletic.com/507940/2018/09/06/questions-about-drug-testing-in-the-nhl-surface-following-nate-schmidts-suspension/
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby Jmalone on Mon Sep 10, 2018 5:45 am

Max Pacioretty traded to the Knights for Tatar, Suzuki, and a 2nd.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby stonewizard51 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:05 am

FLPensFan wrote:

I would need to see some more specifics that I have not seen.....specifically, when the test request was made and when he was tested. In the offseason, if they request a drug test, you have two weeks to take that test. It's all conjecture, but a player that is trying to get something flushed out of their system is probably going to push the limits of when they submit to the test (ie, towards the end of that two week period).

Katie Strang has been doing killer work all year long with the Athletic, and she did a piece on this as well. Among the comments are the fact that Schmidt believes a piece of tainted meat may have been the cause. Might sound far-fetched, but Strang gave an example of an NFL player in 2016 that had a similar statement a few years ago. He was cleared after the NFLPA was able to trace it back to tainted meat the player ate in Mexico during his bye week. Boxer Canelo Anthony was also cited, who went through the same thing with contaminated meat. Anthony submitted to a hair follicle test, which came back negative, and provided more credibility to his statement of the source.

As you said, NHL and NHLPA have agreed on the system, but, it seems like there needs to be a better appeals system built in. I think some here believe it is easy to keep track of all this stuff. It's not. Imagine if you were subject to random drug tests at your work, you knew you were 100% clean, but tested positive for something in a trace amount like this. How would you even begin to track this stuff down, without having the resources a professional baseball player has at their disposal?

Here's the Strang article: https://theathletic.com/507940/2018/09/06/questions-about-drug-testing-in-the-nhl-surface-following-nate-schmidts-suspension/[/quote]


Been there done that. Time spent in the military and working for the government as well as a government contractor. I always left the table once smoking started for that reason. I couldn't afford the situation where I'd test positive and accused of something I wasn't guilty of doing. Once I did test positive but that was do to lab contamination but still I was ****ed I had to go thru all that fallout. It wasn't pleasant and the implication was always there. I could guarantee you I'd be the one to be called in for a random test. Still I had to be responsible for not allowing anything into my body that wasn't doctor prescribed and even then that wasn't a guarantee.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby Jim on Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:28 am

Drug testing around the holidays... if you have had poppyseed roll = screwed.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby stonewizard51 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 10:22 am

Now that's a catch 22. I like poppy seed rolls but if I eat one I'll test positive for a banned substance. :face:
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby LimerickPensFan on Mon Sep 10, 2018 3:18 pm

stonewizard51 wrote:Now that's a catch 22. I like poppy seed rolls but if I eat one I'll test positive for a banned substance. :face:

The actual likelihood that you will is small. It depends where the seeds were grown and processed. It isn't actually the seeds themselves, but dust and oils on the poppy seeds that cause someone to test positive. If they come from a place that clean them and process them well, you won't have a positive test. If they don't, well...
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby Steve Dave on Tue Sep 11, 2018 4:49 am

stonewizard51 wrote:Now that's a catch 22. I like poppy seed rolls but if I eat one I'll test positive for a banned substance. :face:

You could have Mrs. Seinfeld pee in a cup for you.
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Re: 2018 Summer Game Plan

Postby stonewizard51 on Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:18 am

LimerickPensFan wrote:
stonewizard51 wrote:Now that's a catch 22. I like poppy seed rolls but if I eat one I'll test positive for a banned substance. :face:

The actual likelihood that you will is small. It depends where the seeds were grown and processed. It isn't actually the seeds themselves, but dust and oils on the poppy seeds that cause someone to test positive. If they come from a place that clean them and process them well, you won't have a positive test. If they don't, well...


I probably should have used the rolleyes emote for sarcasm rather than the facepalm.
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